lundi 30 mars 2015

"Gaumont 120 ans; Alice Guy depuis que le cinéma existe" Exposition au Cent-Quatre Paris Studio L.G premier studio d'Alice Guy au Buttes Chaumont

 Gaumont 120 ans; Alice Guy depuis que le cinéma existe -Exposition 104 Paris
 Gaumont 120 ans; Alice Guy depuis que le cinéma existe -Exposition 104 Paris










 Gaumont 120 ans; Alice Guy depuis que le cinéma existe -Exposition 104 Paris





 Gaumont 120 ans; Alice Guy depuis que le cinéma existe -Exposition 104 Paris





 Gaumont 120 ans; Alice Guy depuis que le cinéma existe -Exposition 104 Paris

 Gaumont 120 ans; Alice Guy depuis que le cinéma existe -Exposition 104 Paris


 Gaumont 120 ans; Alice Guy depuis que le cinéma existe -Exposition 104 Paris

 Gaumont 120 ans; Alice Guy depuis que le cinéma existe -Exposition 104 Paris


samedi 29 novembre 2014

*Be Natural ! ©riginal Story of Alice Guy Blaché by Herself


  *Be Natural ! ©riginal Story of Alice Guy Blaché by Herself
 *Be Natural ! ©riginal Story of Alice Guy Blaché by Herself

 *Be Natural ! ©riginal Story of Alice Guy Blaché by Herself


 *Be Natural ! ©riginal Story of Alice Guy Blaché by Herself
 *Be Natural ! ©riginal Story of Alice Guy Blaché by Herself
When creating a who’s who list of the early days of film, the list is dominated by men – Cecil B. De Mille, D. W. Griffith, Louis B. Mayer. But there was an obscured hero of cinema’s early years making film alongside those males – Alice Guy-Blachè. In 1896, Guy-Blachè became the first female director, screenwriter, and producer. Regardless of gender, Guy-Blachè left a legacy of innovation in film. Her 1896 release, The Cabbage Fairy, was one of the first narrative films ever made.  Guy-Blachè experimented with hand-tint colorization and even directed with one of the first sound machines decades before The Jazz Singer was released in 1927. Among her 22 feature-length films was The Lure—a film that made an impact on the city of Winchester by sparking a censorship debate, a conflict that found its way to the local courts in the fall of 1914.
The Lure, adapted from a play by George Scarborough, follows the lives of two young women lured into prostitution and enslaved in a house of ill repute. One young woman is enticed away from a fashionable dancing school by a dashing stranger. The other young woman, working in a department store to support an invalid mother, is lured by the promise of “easy night work.”  The two ladies are shown being mistreated and suffering forced sexual advances in a brothel; however, as the film nears its end, the women are rescued by a private detective and good ultimately triumphs.
On 21 October 1914, Fred and Herman Hable, theater managers, rented an auditorium in Winchester for a showing of The Lure, but Dr. Julian H. Ward, mayor of Winchester, had other plans. Without having seen the movie, Ward believed the film was indecent and immoral and authorized the police force to forbid its showing. The Hable brothers, having invested their money in leasing the public theater and paying licenses and state fees, pled their case to the mayor. The National Board of Censors even reviewed the movie and found nothing objectionable in it, but despite the Hables’ protestations, Ward prevailed in shutting down the theater. On 29 October 1914, the Hables responded by filing suit in the Corporation Court of Winchester to obtain an injunction to overturn the mayor’s order.
The case file of Fred H. Hable and Herman H. Hable vs. the Mayor of Winchester, 1914-005, includes correspondence and affidavits voicing either support or opposition for the showing of the film. Since the Hables had shown the film in many cities (including Richmond, Newport News, and Baltimore) before coming to Winchester, they submitted correspondence from officials from those cities as evidence that the film was not considered indecent. J. W. Sibert, a Winchester resident, submitted a letter to Mayor Ward, dated 27 October 1914, detailing his opposition to the mayor’s actions.  Sibert wrote, “I regard this film no worse in its pictures and ideas than many others that have been shown, which have not been objected to or prohibited in Winchester.” Sibert was of the opinion that “the whole story told by the film teaches a good lesson of warning to innocent and inexperienced girls who go to large cities and there meet dangers and temptations that they have never known before. The moral of the story is a good one, and the picture is a beautiful one in the way it ends.”
Thomas F. Dean, manager of the New Academy of Music in Baltimore, also voiced support for The Lure claiming that it contained a “strong moral lesson.” Dean submitted a letter to the court, writing, “I saw it myself, and thousands of Baltimoreans of both sexes and all ages also saw it, among them were many of our most prominent, intelligent, and refined citizens.”  Dean also believed that the story ended “beautifully in wrong-doing being punished and goodness and right prevailing.”
Not everyone had such glowing recommendations for the film. Robert G. Gray and George H. Heist, viewers of the film, considered the picture “obscene” and opposed the film showing in Winchester. Their joint affidavit includes a descriptive review of every scene that they found objectionable including the “interior of a bawdy house” and language that clearly implied that one character “shall sell her body to men for money.” Mr. Gray and Mr. Heist’s opinion of the end of the movie differed starkly from Mr. Dean’s expressed “beautiful” end: “…of course both girls are rescued in the end and virtue triumphs as it usually does in plays and pictures whose filthy scenes and suggestive lines are designed to attract the curiosity of the public.”
The mayor submitted little in evidence to support his cause except for a legal citation that stated his powers as mayor allowed him to “stop publishing or exhibiting an obscene picture.” The judge offered his opinion that any decision to grant the injunction against the mayor’s actions would be an assumption that the court was ruling on whether the movie was obscene or not since the ruling would allow the movie to be shown. The judge indicated that the case was not one for a court of equity. Unfortunately, we will never know if the citizens of Winchester were exposed to the allures of The Lure, as on 11 November 1914 a motion to dismiss without prejudice was submitted to the court by Fred and Herman Hable.

With those two simple words [BE NATURAL] Alice Guy Blaché transformed the art of screenacting for all time

  With those two simple words [BE NATURAL] Alice Guy Blaché transformed the art of screenacting for all time
 With those two simple words [BE NATURAL] Alice Guy Blaché transformed the art of screenacting for all time

 With those two simple words [BE NATURAL] Alice Guy-Blaché transformed the art of screenacting for all time

 With those two simple words [BE NATURAL] Alice Guy Blaché transformed the art of screenacting for all time

 With those two simple words [BE NATURAL] Alice Guy Blaché transformed the art of screenacting for all time

 With those two simple words [BE NATURAL] Alice Guy Blaché transformed the art of screenacting for all time, since 1896

mardi 6 janvier 2009

"Le coucher d 'Yvette" Premier Strip Tease au Cinema Alice Guy Blache Cinema Pioneer Whitney Museum 2009 New York


Il y a 112 ans : Le cabaret parisien "Le Divan japonais" présente le premier spectacle professionnel de strip-tease.
Au lendemain de la désastreuse défaite de 1870 et du drame sanglant de la Commune, Paris s'étourdit dans le plaisir et les fêtes. Des Grands Boulevards à la Butte Montmartre, s'étend un quartier, où se mêlent ouvriers et bourgeois en quête de plaisirs. Bals campagnards au sommet de la Butte Montmartre et bals musettes sur ces pentes attirent le chaland. Cafés chantants, cafés-concerts et les nombreux bars sont le rendez-vous des bohèmes, artistes et littéraires. A côté des grandes salles de cafés-concerts, il y a de plus modestes établissements où pour une consommation modique, les chanteuses du jour, accompagnées de musiciens, alternent obscénités et bluettes pour des bourgeois et aristocrates ravis de cet encanaillement. "Le Divan japonais", sis au 75, rue des Martyrs, est l'un de ces cafés-concerts. Les décors intérieurs sont faits de meubles en bois laqué et en bambous, de lampions et de peintures sur soie dans le style japonais très en vogue à l'époque. En 1892, le peintre Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec y réalise sa fameuse affiche intitulée, le "Divan japonais". C'est dans ce café-concert que la diseuse Yvette Guilbert et la danseuse Jane Avril remportent leurs premiers succès. Ce serait dans ce même établissement que Charles Baudelaire, a pu voir, le 13 mars 1894, "Le Coucher d'Yvette", un spectacle révolutionnaire, le premier strip-tease. Sur scène, une comédienne, Blanche Cavalli, se déshabille avant de se mettre au lit et enlève tous ses vêtements, le gilet, puis la robe, pièce par pièce, comme quelqu'un qui va se coucher, sans plus, mais elle va jusqu'au bout et c'est la première fois. A la fin, elle se retrouve, en apparence, nue, mais en fait, elle porte un collant couleur chair. Le Grand Larousse universel définit pourtant cet art comme "un numéro de déshabillage lent et suggestif exécuté sur une musique de fond ou de danse". En 1897, la première réalisatrice de cinéma française, Alice Guy-Blaché, tourne la version cinéma du "Coucher d'Yvette" pour la Gaumont. Sources : Toulouse-Lautrec, les lumières de la nuit/Claire et José Fresches, découvertes Gallimard, 1999, n° 132.

jeudi 21 août 2008

"Miss Dundee" SEXY Dresseuse de Chiennes par Alice Guy



Miss Dundee et ses Chiens savants est un film français réalisé par Alice Guy en 1902
Enregistrement d'un numéro de chiens savants présenté dans un music-hall parisien par Miss Dundee.
Un moment classique des numéros d'animaux savants est l'intervention de l'un d'entre eux — souvent le plus talentueux — qui feint la désobéissance ou la maladresse dans la réalisation d'un exercice. Le chien, chargé ici de cette partie, est vêtu d'un frac et lorsqu'il fait le mort, sa « veuve » (de la famille des canidés, s'entend) éplorée est habillée en grand deuil : ce moment anecdotique prend aujourd'hui valeur de document sur l'époque.
L'habit de scène de Miss Dundee est des plus chastes ; cependant, par la façon dont il souligne la taille et met en valeur des charmes suggérés, le film a conservé une dimension sexy encore plus flagrante aujourd'hui

le numéro de Miss Dundee a été enregistré la même année par le cinéaste britannique Alf Collins dans Trained Dogs.

mercredi 21 mai 2008

SEXY ALICE GUY !! Pantomime entre femmes

http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x5obo7_genese_creation"La fée aux choux "sous amphetamine ZOETROPE de Franck Mercky
Enregistrement d'une danse par Mesdemoiselles Lally et Julyett de l'Olympia.

autre titre pour "Au Bal de Flore" : "Gavotte directoire" 1900

film pantomime entre femme erotique sexy en couleur d'origine colorié au pochoir image par image Pantomine entre femme Pierrete rentre bourée ... elle finira par embrasser la belle sur la bouche